085: Developing Your Questions to Ask the Interviewer

Developing Your Questions to Ask the Interviewer

All this month, we’ve been diving into the job interview including how to answer difficult questions and how to prepare for a behavioral interview. Today we’re talking about the questions you can ask the interviewer.

Make it organic.

I’m not a fan of having generic questions to ask every employer, because they tend to sound…generic.

Rather, do your homework in preparing for the interview. As you prep, your questions will come organically.

Show your existing knowledge.

When asking your questions, tell the interviewer what you already know relative to your question. This will make you seem far more intelligent.

Here’s an example:

“When researching your company, I discovered you are widely recognized as number 1 in customer service in your space. To what do you attribute your reputation for exceptional customer service?”

Make sure you’re asking the right person.

If you’re in an interview with someone from HR, ask questions about benefits.

If you’re in an interview with the person who would be your direct boss, ask questions about the department.

If you’re in an interview with a potential co-worker, ask questions about the boss’ leadership and management style.

Write your questions down.

You’re in a high-stress situation; there’s no need to compound it by trying to remember your well-thought-out questions.

Bring a padfolio along with your questions written out; the padfolio also serves as a place to keep the business cards you are collecting and extra copies of your resume.

IN GENERAL, here are some excellent areas for questioning:

-Interviewer’s own experience with the company

-Company’s/departments greatest challenges

-Expectations for first 30/90 days on the job

-Greatest rewards for working at that company/in that department

-Company’s support of continuing education (i.e. master’s degree)

-Description of the ideal candidate for the position

IN GENERAL, stay away from asking questions about:

-Salary

-Vacations/paid time off

-Anything that might have a negative connotation (such as the company’s recent credit rating drop)

-Specific coverage of medical benefits that might reveal a pre-existing condition

-Anything that might reveal personal information about you

In wrapping up, there’s a world of difference between the candidate who asks the “canned” interview questions and the candidate who has clearly done her homework and asks very targeted questions based on her research.

In the best possible scenario, these are questions you truly need the answer to in order to evaluate whether you want to work for that employer or not – because the interview should be a two-way exchange of information.

In wrapping up, there’s a world of difference between the candidate who asks the “canned” interview questions and the candidate who has clearly done her homework and asks very targeted questions based on her research.

In the best possible scenario, these are questions you truly need the answer to in order to evaluate whether you want to work for that employer or not – because the interview should be a two-way exchange of information.

Follow My YouTube channel (Lesa Edwards); it’s chocked full of valuable career management content in easily digestible bites.

Want to speak with an expert about your career/job search goals? Need help figuring out what’s holding you back from achieving your dream career? Let’s talk. Here’s the link to schedule a 30-minute consult call with me: https://my.timetrade.com/book/D6KLN. Hope to see you soon!

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